Pet Search Help

The search tools are provided to help narrow down the list of available dogs based on the adopter’s specific needs and interests.  The search tools are merely a starting point, you should always talk to an adoption counselor to find out more about any animal you are interested in.  If you do not find the animal you are looking for, please email email hidden; JavaScript is required for more personalized assistance.

 

Click for a more detailed explanation of each search tool.

Search by Name
Search by Breed
Search by Sex
Search by Age
Search by Energy Level
Child Compatibility Score
Cat Compatibility Score
Dog Compatibility Score
Home Alone Score

 

Search by Name

Search for any string of letters in the animal’s name

 

Search by Breed

Please note that the majority of dogs at APA! are presumed to be mixed-breed dogs (unless otherwise specified) and that the breeds listed are merely guesses, based on appearance, and may not be accurate.  In many cases the breed listed was chosen by the originating shelter and not by APA!  Also note, that breed, particularly with mixed breed dogs, does not guarantee any particular temperament, trait, or ability. 

 

Search by Sex

Self explanatory

 

Search by Age

Self explanatory

 

Search by Energy Level

High  –  Athletic. Above average exercise needs.
Medium – Average energy.  Requires regular exercise.
Low – Couch potato.  Below average exercise needs.

 

Child Compatibility Score

Please note that these scores are just guesses based on observations from volunteers, fosters, previous owners and staff.  For many dogs at the shelter we have no data about how they are with children.  These dogs, by default, will have a score of 3.  All dogs should have a meet and greet with the entire family, especially when children are involved.  Children should NEVER be left alone with any animal and all interactions between children and animals should be closely supervised and monitored for safety and stress.

5 – Lived with Children. This usually means that the dog has been observed in multiple interactions with children and has done well.  This score may be based on the comments of the previous owner.
4 – Shows Promise. This means that there are positive indications that this dog might be good with children, based on observations of the dog with a child, or based on temperament.
3 – Unknown or Mixed Reviews. This may either means that no information is known about how this dog interacts with children, or it may mean that there were mixed indicators (some positive/some negative) of how this dog might interact with children.  Talk to an adoption counselor to discuss the details for this specific dog.
2 – Let’s Talk. It is important to talk to a behavior counselor to learn what cautions/challenges this dog might have with children.  It may be that this dog should only go home with older children or dog savvy children.
1 – No Children. This dog can not go to a home with small children.

 

Cat Compatibility Score

Please note that these scores are just guesses based on observations from volunteers, fosters, previous owners and staff.  For many dogs at the shelter we have no data about how they are with cats.  These dogs, by default, will have a score of 3.  All dogs should be slowly and safely introduced to the other animals in the home, and should be supervised until the owner is confident in the relationship.  Talk to the behavior team about the best method for introducing new animals to the home.

5- Lived with Cats. This usually means that the dog has been observed in multiple interactions with cats and has done well.  This score may be based on the comments of the previous owner or foster.
4- Shows Promise. This score means there are positive indications that this dog might be good with some cats, based on observations of the dog with a cat, or based on the dog’s temperament.
3 – Unknown or Mixed Reviews.  This may either means that no information is known about how this dog interacts with cats, or it may mean that there were mixed indicators (some positive/some negative) of how this dog might interact with cats.  Talk to an adoption counselor to discuss the details for this specific dog.
2 – Let’s Talk. It is important to talk to a behavior counselor to learn what cautions/challenges this dog might have with cats.  It may be that this dog should only go home with cats of certain temperaments.
1 – No cats. This dog can not go to a home with cats.

Dog Compatibility Score

Please note that these scores are just guesses based on observations from volunteers, fosters, previous owners and staff.  For many dogs at the shelter we have no data about how they are with other dogs.  These dogs, by default, will have a score of 3.  A meet and greet with all the dogs in the home is always recommended and sometimes required.  All dogs should be slowly and safely introduced to the other animals in the home, and should be supervised until the owner is confident in their relationship.

5 – Lived with Dogs. This usually means that the dog has been observed in multiple interactions with other dogs and has done well.  This score may be based on the comments of the previous owner or foster.
4 – Shows Promise. This score means there are indications that this dog might be good with some dogs, based on observations of the dog with other dogs, or based on the dog’s temperament.
3 – Unknown or Mixed Reviews. This may either means that no information is known about how this dog interacts with dogs, or it may mean that there were mixed indicators (some positive/some negative) of how this dog might interact with other dogs.  Talk to an adoption counselor to discuss the details for this specific dog.
2 – Let’s Talk It is important to talk to a behavior counselor to learn what cautions/challenges this dog might have with other dogs.  This dog may have restrictions (size/gender/temperament) on which types of dogs it is compatible with.
1 – No Dogs. This dog can not go to a home with other dogs.

Home Alone Score

This score is different from the other scores. The Home Alone Score represents what is known about the dog’s house training and/or destructiveness when left alone. It indicates how well a dog is expected to do when left alone — either loose in the house or in a crate — for an extended period during the day. For many dogs at the shelter, we have no data how they behave in the home or when left alone.  These dogs, by default, will have a score of 3.  Puppies under 6 months are assumed to be not completely potty trained and so will have a default score of 2.  Please note that dogs can suffer separation anxiety or forget their house training under the stress of going to a new home and it is not uncommon for a house-trained dog to have accidents during the first days in his/her new home. Also note that lifetime behavior support is available from APA! to help you work through any training issues you have with your pet.

5 – Can be Left Alone This usually means the dog has had known experience in a home and can be left alone (either in a crate or loose in the house) without accidents or destructiveness.
4 – Almost There. This usually means the dog may be almost potty trained or have mild separation anxiety.  It could also mean that there is not enough experience with the dog in a home to know for sure, but that it seems to be potty trained in the shelter.
3 – Unknown or Mixed Reviews. This may either means that no information is known about how this dog is in a home, or it may mean that there were mixed indicators (some positive/some negative) of how this dog is in a home.  Talk to an adoption counselor to discuss the details for this specific dog.
2 – Needs a Little Work This dog may require additional training or modifications in order to be successful when left alone for extended periods.  Puppies under 6 months have this as their default score unless further details are known.
1 – Home Alone Challenges  This dog would do best in a home where it will not be left alone for extended periods of time.  Our behavior team can assist with techniques and strategies for when the dog must be left alone.